Tag Archives: writing

Why Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me At All

A recent article by Gerald Nelms, “Why Plagiarism Doesn’t Bother Me At All,” has been circulating on the WPA-L listserv and getting deserved attention for its response to the oftentimes alarmist reactions to referential and source-based academic writing.

Now, plagiarism doesn’t irritate me at all. Student plagiarism doesn’t surprise or shock me. It doesn’t raise my heart rate. And perhaps most surprisingly, it doesn’t make me think any less of the student who has plagiarized. In fact, I now expect plagiarism, I anticipate it, I even provoke it. I want it to happen. And it always does, because I create assignments that virtually require it. Now, you may be reacting to my saying this in the same way that others have in the plagiarism workshops I have facilitated for 15 plus years: with shock.

WIDE-EMU 2015

The Eastern Michigan University Written Communication Program and the Michigan State University Writing and Digital Environments Research Center invite you (faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, teachers, community members, anyone interested) to propose ideas for the fourth WIDE-EMU, a free (un)conference on Saturday, October 10, 2015 in East Lansing, Mich. We seek proposals that engage the framing question for this year’s event:

Is ____ writing?

What counts as writing? The definition of what we consider to be writing is constantly shifting, evolving, and expanding. Writing classrooms now ask students to work with social media, web design, data visualization, image manipulation, and a myriad of other artifacts and practices. The question is: can we call any of those activities writing? How does writing relate to audio, visual, digital, and multimodal composing processes? How do we situate writing in the classroom, especially when students increasingly engage in the production of artifacts that feature a range of modes (textual, visual, sonic, haptic, digital, and more)? Is writing different from or similar to making? Should multimodal making be considered writing? What are the institutional and disciplinary pressures for claiming writing? Who has the agency to claim what is/isn’t writing? What are the implications of assigning writing to all forms of making? What discourses do we construct and perpetuate by claiming the act of writing? In an age of digital consumption and production, how do we prepare students for complex work that goes far beyond the act of writing? Learn more about WIDE-EMU ’15 at https://sites.google.com/site/wideemu15/.

WIDE-EMU 2013

The Eastern Michigan University Written Communication Program and the Michigan State University Writing and Digital Environments Research Center invite you (faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, teachers, community members, anyone interested) to propose ideas for the third annual WIDE-EMU, a free (un)conference on Saturday, October 12, 2013 in Ypsilanti, Mich. We seek proposals that engage the framing question for this year’s event:

Free?

What is “Free?” What does “free” mean as in open access (scholarship, textbooks, courses), “free” as in liberty (copyrights/lefts, released, unrestrained), and “free” as in without charge (software, conferences, beer)? How do these and competing notions of “Free(dom)” operate when we teach–particularly when we teach writing, and particularly when we focus on the use of technology to teach writing? And what are the hidden and not so hidden costs of “Free,” both literal and metaphorical? Learn more about WIDE-EMU ’13 at https://sites.google.com/site/wideemu13/.